Showing posts with label things to do with kids. Show all posts
Showing posts with label things to do with kids. Show all posts

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough



One thing that I don't like to have on hand because of the mess is Play-Do. I shouldn't be so insistent about not having it around, because I really enjoyed playing with it as a child and I was allowed to play with it at Grandma's.... Hmmm.. I don't really recall playing with it at home, though. I guess that's because Grandma doesn't mind the mess.

Whenever my kids play with Play-Do, it ends up getting mashed into the rug or in little Suzie's hair, or getting shoved up a nose or somewhere where you don't want that colorful mess to be.

However, there really isn't a no Play-Do rule in my house and in the winter time I find myself running out of idead for my kids to do that aren't always "Go watch tv or play a video game. Sometimes I like for them to do something productive like clean the house and pick up their toys, but on those days where I JUST DON'T want to hear them arguing with me or picking fights with each other, Play-Do sounds like a pretty good thing to have on hand.... But wait, I don't have any. 

So what should I do?

I know! Make some of my own!


How to Make Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

What You Need for Play Dough

Making play dough is about the easiest thing you'll ever do in your life. For this recipe, we just have to ingredients: 


  • Any fun things you'd like to bring out. I like to use sprinkles, candy eyes, chocolate chips, and whatever other fun edible things I have left over from previous baking experiments. 



How to Put It Together

Seriously, this is so easy, just mix together 1 cup powdered sugar and 3/4 cups peanut butter. If the dough is still sticky, add more peanut butter.



It's so easy, even I can do it!




I had to hold his hand back for the picture, otherwise, every time I tried to take a picture of him eating the dough, it was already in his mouth being consumed. 


Conclusion

Let me tell you, I was very frustrated when taking pictures for this post. I had cleared a space (because my whole counter is always filled with something) wiped it up, and made the dough without a hitch. 

I took pictures along the way and had some really cute pictures of my son pulling and shaping the play dough, just really digging his fingers into it and making faces with the eye candies and such and then when I went to look at them, my memory card had stopped working! All of those pictures never saved! 

I ended up using my phone to take pictures, but by then, my son was finished with playing and starting to get a little tummy ache from eating so much.

If you don't want to waste the dough and you're not squeemish, you can melt some chocolate and make some peanut butter balls or as Indiana-ites call them- Buck-eyes.

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Monday, February 18, 2019

How to Make a Sensory Bottle

This may contain Amazon affiliate links and ads, which means that if you purchase something from them, I may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you.

I love sensory bottles. I love to shake them up watch as all the glitter and other objects swirl in them and head to the bottom.

When my oldest started having difficulty at school and then at home, I became particularly interested in them as a way to time time outs with hopes that they would be an easy and painless way to get my son to settle down and listen.

They worked for a little bit, but my sensory bottle at the time was kind of a flop.

So a couple of years later, I decided to try it again, but this time, just for fun and as a way to keep my kids busy and entertained for part of the day since we'd be home for President's day.



What You Will Need

  • Clear Plastic Bottle (with lid)- Any bottle will probably work, but I prefer the ones with a smooth side. For this project, I used left over bottles from Sparkling Ice. With 21 different flavors, it should be easy to find a favorite. You can either buy them as a pack or as a single in stores. 

  • Water
  • Clear Glue or Clear Liquid Soap (Dish or Hand)- For the project we did today, we used blue dish soap before remembering that we had some clear hand soap, but it still worked out. It's ok to use a colored glue or soap, but make sure that you can see through it and also be aware that it could change the color if you add food coloring. 









  • Glitter, Sequins, Beads (water beads), or Buttons- anything that is small enough to fit inside the bottle that you don't mind ever using again because once you use it, it's stuck in there. 




How to Put It Together

Step 1: Gather what you need. 


Step 2: Rinse out Clear Water Bottle so it's clean.

Step 3: Add water- the instructions that I got said to fill the bottle halfway with water, but I found that to be too much. Fill bottle 2/5 with water.

Step 4: Add food coloring- a little goes a long way. 

Step 5: Add beads, buttons, glitter, sequins- Choose just one, add a little of all- it's your bottle, add what you'd like. If adding water beads, be aware that they grow, so less is more.

Step 6: Add soap or glue the rest of the way. Leave a small space for air.

Step 7: Super glue the lid onto the water bottle.

Step 8: Shake or flip and watch the magic happen!


The sensory bottles my son and daughter both made.


My Tips and Suggestions

This is the second time that I have done this DIY Sensory Bottle and although it's better than the first time I've made one, there are still things that I would change.

This time, I filled the bottle halfway with water and then halfway with dish soap. I would make that 2/5 of the way with water and 3/5 of the way with glue/soap.

We used a blue dish soap, so when my daughter added her red coloring, it made a really dark purple. I told her that would happen, and she was ok with that. Clear is better if you want to make a true color.

I used a liquid coloring for soap. I didn't have a dropper, so I poured a little bit into each bottle and it made each sensory bottle darker than I would have liked.  Start with a drop of dye and add a drop at a time to reach your color. 

The blue sensory bottle shows the glitter and buttons, but the red/purple was too dark to show them. The silver and gold glitter show up, amazingly, though.

Hold your sensory bottles up to a bright window and watch it shine!

Conclusion

Enjoy your sensory bottle! It's a pretty quick and fun craft to make. Make sure that the top of the bottle is dry when you glue the lid to it or, there could be disaster, but once it's dry, you should expect a mess free activity that you can use to entertain your child for a while.

My kids are a little bit older, so their appeal didn't last as long, but it's something that they can enjoy when they feel the need too... kind of like a lava lamp!





Thursday, September 28, 2017

10 Learning Crafts to Do With Kids


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I've been a stay at home parent for four and a half years. Over this time, I try to do my awesome mommy thing and do projects and crafts with my kids to help them learn. As an expert, keep my kids out of trouble, mom, I've had experience with Pinterest and looking things up. I've compiled a list of my top 10 favorites crafts. Most of these I've tried and the others look promising. I hope you're able to enjoy. (Click the links for instructions on how to make some of these crafts.)


1.  Paper Chains  This was my favorite thing to do around Christmas time. It was super easy to make and it helped you count down the days until Christmas. Teach your kids counting, colors, how to use scissors and patterns. Click the link to learn how to make a paper chain.



2. Bake cupcakes! Grab your favorite box of Betty Crocker or use a family recipe. Have the kids help you measure out the ingredients to learn measurements or just how to help. When the cup cakes are done baking and are ready to be topped, make some vanilla frosting, divide it into bowls, and add food color to each bowl for different color. You can teach your child colors in a fun edible way and if you want to add sprinkles or other toppings, you can also teach your child to count along.




3. ABC Magnets! What's nice about magnets is that they can stick to your refrigerator or dishwasher. Have your child play with them and try to spell them out. They can play with them while you cook dinner or you can use them on some metal sheet pans. Encourage them to remember the letters and try to sound out goofy word concoctions, they'll get a laugh out of you trying.




4. Paint in a Bag- I wasn't sure how my kids would like this, especially my older kids, but they really enjoyed moving the paint around and mixing the colors. On the plus side, it's also mess free! Click the link to learn how to do this.



5. Peanut Butter Play Dough - Kids can learn all sorts of things when they play with play dough. It's even better when it's peanut butter! You can add chocolate chips or other edible ingredients to count with or to help sculpt. Play around with shapes, teach about size. If your child is allergic to peanut butter, try this one. You can color this, so that's a plus, but I'm not sure on the taste. 




6. Make a bird feeder! I've made my bird feeders with pine cones, peanut butter, and bird seed. It's super easy, you just tie a string around a pine cone or apple stem, layer it with peanut butter, roll it in bird seed, and then hang it up outside.  Teach your child how to take care of other creatures and sit and watch the different kind of animals that come by to eat from it. 






7. Colored Pasta- I haven't done this one yet, but I definitely want to try. This is such a great idea! you can teach your kids about colors, teach them math by adding and subtracting, and when you're finished, you can teach them motor skills by making jewelry. 



8. Sensory Bottles- Help your child learn texture, colors, density, and more with these Do It Yourself sensory bottles. 






9. Ornaments! I'm not an artist, but I try to do something creative each year with my kids to hand out to grandparents or to keep for myself. My favorite one to do is the salt dough hand print ornaments which is in the link above. This doesn't really teach your kids anything, but it's a nice keep sake to have.

10. Go outside and explore! This isn't a craft, but it is a great learning experience. Watch bugs and look at the clouds. Discuss the color and texture of the leaves and talk about the temperature. The outdoors has a never ending supply of learning tools.


   Tell me which crafts are your favorites or which ones that you like to do with your kids that aren't on this list.